Tuesday, May 28, 2013

Featured Book - Hind Cartwheel

Hind Cartwheel
by
Lawrence Winkler


Description 

In the summer of 1980, a maverick young doctor gave it all up, to hitchhike around the world.

The first part of his odyssey took him through South America and up through Africa, accompanied by his mythical hunter companion, Orion.

His vision quest continued around the second cartwheel of the European Grand Tour.

In Hind Cartwheel, blessed by the living goddess on his thirtieth birthday, he spins the dharma wheel of the Indian subcontinent.

About the Author 

Lawrence Winkler is an ancient physician and phenomenologist, traveler, mushroom forager, and natural philosopher. As a young man, he hitchhiked around the world, for five transformative years. His middle age is morphing from medicine to manuscript. He has a passion for habitat protection, including the (hopefully) final repairs on a leaky roof. Westwood Lake Chronicles was his first book. He lives on Vancouver Island with Robyn and Shiva, tending their garden and vineyard, and dreams.


Connect with the author

http://www.lawrencewinkler.com

Wednesday, May 22, 2013

Two Kinds of Readers, Two Kinds of Writers


This very insightful piece came to me via email the other day.  I want to thank Mr. Sackett for allowing me to post this to my blog.









TWO KINDS OF READERS, TWO KINDS OF WRITERS



When you are beginning as a writer, it's a good idea to decide what kind of writer you're going to be. The kind of writer you are will define what kind of reader will be appealed to by your work. And the kind of writer you are is probably determined by what kind of reader you are.


Take me, for instance.

I started out loving detective stories. I was a precocious reader; I can't have been older than six when I read Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's A Study in Scarlet. It gave me such horrible nightmares that my parents forbade me from reading any more Conan Doyle.

Luckily, my parents had short memories. By the time I was in high school, I bought a one-volume collection of Sherlock Holmes stories and read them all. I even joined a society of Holmes addicts, called I think the Baker Street Irregulars, which published a journal to which I subscribed.

I moved from Holmes to other detective-story writers. My two favorites were Raymond Chandler and John Dickson Carr -- and two more dissimilar writers could hardly be found. But I read widely among other detective-story authors as well. Since I wanted to write, I started trying to write detective stories and even finished a novel while I was in college.

Suddenly, however, I discovered that in reading many detective stories I was reading the same story over and over. The names and places were different, but all the stories had the same structure: crime-detection-solution. And I was getting bored.

Then one day, looking over the magazines in the rack at the drug store, I was attracted by the cover of Amazing Stories. Curious, I bought a copy and read it. I was hooked by a narrative by Richard S. Shaver, purporting to be a true account of alien beings living underground in the Earth. In common with many readers who wrote in to the magazine, I didn't really believe it, but it certainly was circumstantial -- and, more important, unlike the detective stories I had been reading. And thus I began to explore science fiction to see what it was like.

What I discovered was that the writers of science fiction wrote nearly every kind of story there was except romance. Robert A. Heinlein wrote future history and four-dimensional geometry. A.E. van Vogt attacked racism in Slan by dealing with genetic mutation, exposed the narrowness of academic specialties in The Voyage of the Space Beagle, retold the history of the Roman Empire in The Wizard of Linn, and introduced general semantics into a world of non-Aristotelian logic in The World of Null-A. Isaac Asimov explored the basic rules of robotics. And while most writers in the field celebrated the advances of science and technology, Ray Bradbury was pointing out that these advances had a dark side.

There were some basic story structures, but whereas detective fiction had only one, science-fiction had several: what-if and if-this-goes-on were two that appealed to me. So I began trying to write science fiction. My first published story was based on Plato's allegory of the cave, translated into an interplanetary future. I had some modest successes; one of my short novels, "Hail to the Chief," a what-if story using political science as the science, has been anthologized three times.

From this experience I discovered that I was the kind of writer who didn't want to write the same story twice; and even though all but one of my published novels is what I call a fictional biography, the biographies are of three different kinds of people who lead three different kinds of lives. My forthcoming novel, Rabbi Yeshua, is a fictional biography of still another kind of person. Therefore I will appeal to readers who do not want to read the same story over again.

Unfortunately for me, there are fewer readers of that type than of the other. The best-selling fiction books may be in different genres, but the bestsellers in each genre are all built on the same pattern, showing that what most readers really enjoy is finding a story they feel comfortable with and reading it over and over again.

When I was in Thailand, my next-door neighbor was an Englishman, part owner and plant manager of a company that manufactured a part used in cell phone towers. He moved away and, knowing that I enjoyed reading, gave me a big box of paperback books that he was through with. They were all spy novels with "No. 1 New York Times Best Seller" printed on the cover. I read several of them by different authors and was dismayed to discover that they were all the same story, just with different names and places. I gave the box to a young lady I knew who wanted to read books in English to improve her grasp of that language.

This is not to say that there was not a great deal of ingenuity in those spy stories. A writer has to be ingenious to keep telling the same story over and over again and make it seem fresh and new every time For that matter, thinking back to my detective-story days, John Dickson Carr was fiendishly ingenious.

My conclusion is that if you are the kind of reader who enjoys reading the same story over and over again, you will be able to write bestsellers if you learn the formula of your genre, reproduce it, and keep on reproducing it with ingenuity. But if you are the kind of reader who likes to read a different story every time, you will be happier writing a different story every time you start to write; but you will not be successful if you try to write bestsellers. Many science-fiction writers are excellent, but not many science-fiction novels have achieved the New York Times Best Seller list.

Thanks again to Mr. Sackett for submitting such a great piece to my blog.

You can find him online at:

Monday, May 20, 2013

Featured Book - Between the Carwheels

Between the Cartwheels
by
Lawrence Winkler

 
 


Description
In the summer of 1980, a maverick young doctor gave it all up, to hitchhike around the world. The first part of his odyssey took him through South America and up through Africa, accompanied by his mythical hunter companion, Orion. Between the Cartwheels is the sequel to that cartwheel, his vision quest continuing now, on the European Grand Tour adventure of a lifetime.


About the Author:

Lawrence Winkler is an ancient physician and phenomenologist, traveler, mushroom forager, and natural philosopher. As a young man, he hitchhiked around the world, for five transformative years. His middle age is morphing from medicine to manuscript. He has a passion for habitat protection, including the (hopefully) final repairs on a leaky roof. Westwood Lake Chronicles was his first book. He lives on Vancouver Island with Robyn and Shiva, tending their garden and vineyard, and dreams.


Connect with the author:
 

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Giveaway - Forgotten Soul

Forgotten Soul
by
Sandra Edwards




Description

*Formerly titled: Broken Wings. Also available in the Soul Searchers Omnibus.

"If you like intrigue, twisted plots, a love story, and an elaborate con worthy of The Sting all rolled into one well written and developed book, you'll love this one" -- Manic Readers

*A Top Pick from The Romance Reviews*

The Story:

Rio Laraquette thought the legend was nothing more than an enchanted tale about star-crossed lovers who left behind a fortune. That is, until she figures out that she--in a past life--was the culprit who stole a shipment of gold and silver and buried it somewhere in the hills of northern Nevada.

While searching for the treasure, Rio's heart begins to ache for a man who's been dead more than one hundred years. They say time heals all wounds, but what if it doesn't...?

More Praise for Forgotten Soul:

"Magical, whimsical, enchanting...a must, Must, MUST read!" --The Crazy Bookworm

"This is the first book I have read by Sandra Edwards but it won't be the last." -- Blackraven's Reviews


~
** Forgotten Soul is the first book in the Soul Searchers Series, approximately 45,000 words (Print Length: 215 Pages).

This book is currently FREE at Amazon for Kindle
Prices are subject to change at any time so please check the price before downloading.



Monday, May 13, 2013

Featured Book - Native Me

Native Me
by
V.R. Janis





Description

This book is filled with a Native American woman's journey as she was raised on a reservation. She shows her feelings, dreams and experiences through her poetry and photographic art.




Saturday, May 11, 2013

Massive Giveaway




To submit to my blog for giveaways, contests and sales please check out my Submissions page for more information.



CLICK HERE TO BE TAKEN TO THE GIVEAWAY



Elle Casey's Springtime Indie Book Giveaway

May 10th - May 15th

190 Titles
1554 Copies

FREE  BOOKS



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